Bookers Seven Plots // FMP

The media gets to spin their stories and you could probably try and put them into the seven story plots in some way or another.  This does depend on who your villain is, and whether he or she succeeds or fails, but I think ultimately there’s something here that I think would work really well alongside the way-finding/navigation aspect that I want to get across.  There needs to be a ‘hook’, or something tangible to follow or align yourself with.  I mean, the journey you’re on in life is not some blind adventure, there is choice but there’s also rule and command, and doing things you don’t like or didn’t want to.  It all comes down to the journey, and how you reach your destination of a life well lived.  Of course, ‘well lived’ is different to each of us, but it’s how you pick those things up along the way that’s important.  To me, it feels very much like storytelling.

Overcoming the Monster

The protagonist sets out to defeat an antagonistic force (often evil) which threatens the protagonist and/or protagonist’s homeland.

Rags to Riches

The poor protagonist acquires things such as power, wealth, and a mate, before losing it all and gaining it back upon growing as a person.

The Quest

The protagonist and some companions set out to acquire an important object or to get to a location, facing many obstacles and temptations along the way.

Voyage and Return

The protagonist goes to a strange land and, after overcoming the threats it poses to him or her, returns with experience.

Comedy

Light and humorous character with a happy or cheerful ending; a dramatic work in which the central motif is the triumph over adverse circumstance, resulting in a successful or happy conclusion. Booker makes sure to stress that comedy is more than humour. It refers to a pattern where the conflict becomes more and more confusing, but is at last made plain in a single clarifying event. Most romances fall into this category.

Tragedy

The protagonist is a hero with one major character flaw or great mistake which is ultimately their undoing. Their unfortunate end evokes pity at their folly and the fall of a fundamentally ‘good’ character.

Rebirth

During the course of the story, an important event forces the main character to change their ways, often making them a better person.

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